Monday, 22 August 2016

Developers and listings, even in the posh bit of Greenwich

Readers will remember that about a year ago we published a plea from some West Greenwich residents about an old industrial building in the posh bit of Greenwich which developers wanted to demolish. http://greenwichindustrialhistory.blogspot.co.uk/2015/06/greenwich-dairy-request-for-help.html
The building was subsequently listed and everyone (except, obviously, the developer) was happy.

Amazingly, now, only a year later it has been delisted and there is a planning application for it awaiting approval.

It appears that the developers requested a reivew of the decision - and that at least one local organisation was told about this. We do not know if the people who originally campaigned were involved and we understand they may be on holiday - we would of course love to hear from them.  It then appears that the Secretary of State decided to overturn the listing decision. There is a long statement about parts of the building which have been reviewed.

Comments on this very welcome


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NOW - for other bits of news.

Kent Underground Research Group are organising a visit to the air raid shelters at the Northfleet Henley's Works.  Henleys were a major cable manufacturer - and in fact Mr. Henley himself once worked in East Greenwich.  I am enclosing this in case any of the cable making fans among you are interested. Contact chris_rayner@btconnect.com  and they suggest looking at http://www.28dayslater.co.uk/henley-air-raid-shelters-northfleet-feb-2011.t58274 . 


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PREFAB NEWS
The Prefab Museum are hosting an event on the Isle of Dogs along with the Friends of the Island History Trust on 23 September. Admission to the archive tea party at 2.15 pm is free, and free tickets (which must be pre-booked) for the guided walk and illustrated talk are available on eventbrite. Walk:https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/guided-walk-on-the-st-johns-estate-remembering-post-war-prefabs-tickets-26939655234  Talk:https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/post-war-prefabs-an-illustrated-talk-tickets-26940007287



OF FOSS WESTCOTT ESQUIRE
WHO SPENT MANY YEARS ABROAD IN THE SERVICE
OF THE EAST INDIA COMPANY AT FORT ST GEORGE
WHERE HE FILL'D SEVERAL IMPORTANT STATIONS
WITH HUMOUR & INTEGRITY
HE RETIRED TO EAST GREENWICH, THE PLACE OF HIS NATIVITY
AND DIED THERE UNIVERSALLY ESTEEMED & LAMENTED
ON THE 20TH DAY OF OCTOBER IN 1765 IN THE 42ND YEAR OF HIS AGE
HE WAS FIRST MARRIED IN INDIA TO ANN PYE
FOR WHOM HE ERECTED THE ADJOINING MONUMENT 


AND WHO LIES INTERRED WITH HIM IN A VAULT NEAR THIS PLACE

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AND - we have a note from Danny

I'd like to take the opportunity to remind you of the Newcomen meeting on 5th September at the Royal Institution "ANNIHILATING SPACE & TIME: 150 YEARS OF TRANSATLANTIC TELECOMMUNICATION." Bookings are available through Eventbrite at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/annihilating-space-time-150-years-of-transatlantic-telecommunication-tickets-24395664088 .

Do come along.





Violet writes "  I previously found lists of ships built by Edward and later Thomas Snellgrove at Deptford but would like to know how they were related (i.e. were they father & son, brothers, etc.) along with any other detail you may have available.

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and - two things from Norman


First of all he says

"My mother was shown a shop in Greenwich where her grandfather worked and used to make the Lord Mayor's whip for the London Lord Mayor's show every year."

Really - does anyone know anything about this???  Sounds really interesting.

and also Norman says:

"I have an ancestor Ayton Hyde (married name was Watts) born about 1821 and, according to 1861 census, born in Cape of Good Hope.  I am trying to find out what her father was doing in Cape of Good Hope at that time as there were few British settlers there at that time. I do know about the 1820 Settlers but Ayton's parents names are not on the list (or at least I cannot find them)  Ayton's father was William Hyde (or Hide) born about 1791. The 1842 census shows him born in Kent and living then on Ship & Billet Row, Woolwich Road, Greenwich, and his occupation was Shipwright.  He was married to Elizabeth (possibly nee Brown Deller).  Their 2nd child was born in Greenwich in 1826, indicating that they had returned from Africa by then. I suspect William Hyde might have gone to Cape of Good Hope in connection with his occupation as a shipwright.  I understand shipbuilding docks around Greenwich were closing around that time so possibly he followed the work.  I deduce he would have been in the Cape from about 1820 (or a bit earlier) till about 1825.
Any clues or leads you can let me have would be much appreciated.

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LAMAS  - on 11th April LAMAS has a talk on Britain's historic lighthouses 'with special reference to London's only lighthouse at Blackwall.   This is the building you can see from the Peninsula on across the river.  Museum of London 6.30

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2 comments:

M said...

Elizabeth has written

I wonder if that this might have been at the Workshop for the Blind in Greenwich High Road. That was a wonderful place with fenders and baskets hanging outside. Inside mattresses were made, eiderdowns refurbished and other essentials manufactured. Making a whip would certainly have been a possibility.

The Workshop was endowed by that great civil engineer James Naysmith who made so much money from his various inventions (for example the steam hammer. There was a good one at Woolwich Dockyard) that he was able to retire at 48. It is said he helped the Greenwich Workshop because of his lifelong interest in astronomy.

Presumably Mansion House might be able to help with details of accounts?

M said...

Norman has asked us to add:

My mother did not give me the address but family tree research shows the business started with James Edward Couldry who was a whip and walking stick maker. His addresses (1865 - 1888) were:
Lower Chester Street
18 Park Row
9 Silver Street
4 Stockwell Street

His son Walter Frederick Couldry carried on the business, and it was he that my mother talked about. His addresses (1890 - 1899) were:
16 Winforton Street
25 St Johns Road, Deptford
9 Greenwich Market (which I presume was a business address).