Wednesday, 19 January 2011

GLIAS and its latest newsletter

Lots of newsletters come through- what have they got to say about Greenwich's Industrial History.

GREATER LONDON INDUSTRIAL ARCHAEOLOGY SOCIETY
Newsletter December 2010.

- tonight - thats 19th January - GLIAS has a speaker,Dan Hayton, on Computers on London - this is about remaining structures from the early days of computing. We very much hope he has a lot to say about JOHN HUMPHERIES HOUSE (we have sent him lot of info). It is at the Willoughby Theatre in Charterhouse Square at 6.30. see you there.

GLIAS also records the retirement of Denis Smith as Chair - he has been Chair since slightly before the year dot- the Society formed around his evening class at Goldsmith's College in the very early 1970s (so it is almost a Greenwich Society!!)

Elsewhere Greenwich does get a few mentions in the newsletter - archaeology at Hilton's Wharf is noted, as is the discovery of the gun platform at Eaglesfield Park (which last night's GIHS speaker detailed). the possible Royal Flying corps remains at Thomas Tallis School and Greenwich Reach excavations.

Richard Buchanan has responded to a request in the newsletter on converted water towers and has noted the one at the old Brook Hospital site - and noted the need for increased water when the hospital took on a general, as distinct from a isolation hospital, role. He also says 'the red brick tower was adapted by increasing the size of the tank to the outside dimensions of the tower, the now visible steelwork painted to match the bricks .... the conversion to domestic use saw the steel replaced by glass. Below this the tiny original windows have been retained. The dwelling was out up for sale at £1.2m.............................'

another point is raised by Bob Rust who asks about a centre rail between Greenwich and Maze Hill stations - what was it for??
Bob also comments on memories of Banning Street 'sitting in a queue to deliver a very small consignment to go on a coaster or be lightered to the docks. ..'often the only distraction in those days was watching the cable coming out of the works over the conveyor/bridge to go into the cable tank of the ship lying alongside'.

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